Author: John

[WATS.ca Archived]

July 2, 2014

Readability and its Implications for Web Content Accessibility

One area of accessibility often overlooked is the readability of the content of your web pages. Not every user may be familiar with terms or terminology being used. Others may not have the same socio-political background, literacy skills or capacity to fully comprehend what it is you are saying. One goal of the content author then is to try and identify their target audience, and then ensures that they are not “writing over their heads”.

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[Photo: Brendan Eich]

April 3, 2014

Consequences and the Mozilla announcement

I have very mixed feelings about the Mozilla announcement today. I’m sure that Mr. Eich is a nice enough guy in person, and smart enough to be respectful of everyone he encounters face-to-face, regardless of their sexual orientation or personal relationships. And yet still…

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March 4, 2014

CSUN For Newbies

The Annual International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference (aka CSUN) is just around the corner. CSUN is an investment and planning for success will maximize that investment – arrive with a plan of what you want to learn and take away from CSUN. As you plan your week, consider the following tips I’ve collected from years past.
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[WATS.ca Archived]

July 2, 2013

ACCESS + KEY still = ACCESSKEY – The XHTML Role Access Module still flawed

The following article is a re-print of an Official Comment made to the Editors of the XHTMLTM 2 Draft Recommendation. It is presented here in a more open form to hopefully stimulate discussion and debate. If you believe, as I do, that the @key attribute has no place in XHTMLTM 2, I urge you to say so to the Draft Editors: www-html@w3.org

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April 25, 2013

DRM at the W3C? Not such a Bad Idea.

Recently, another fear-mongering, not-quite-correct anti-DRM article was posted over at FreeCulture.com. Entitled “Don’t let the myths fool you: the W3C’s plan for DRM in HTML5 is a betrayal to all Web users”, it is another attempt to “Rally-the-Troops” against Premium Content Protection (also referred to as DRM), the W3C’s Encrypted Media Extensions (which is NOT DRM), and a general tsk-tsking and call to action to pressure the W3C to abandon this effort, all in the name of “The Open Web”. While passionate and earnest, the author seems to be operating on a number of fallacious assumptions that need to examined in closer detail.

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