Category: html5

April 25, 2013

DRM at the W3C? Not such a Bad Idea.

Recently, another fear-mongering, not-quite-correct anti-DRM article was posted over at FreeCulture.com. Entitled “Don’t let the myths fool you: the W3C’s plan for DRM in HTML5 is a betrayal to all Web users”, it is another attempt to “Rally-the-Troops” against Premium Content Protection (also referred to as DRM), the W3C’s Encrypted Media Extensions (which is NOT DRM), and a general tsk-tsking and call to action to pressure the W3C to abandon this effort, all in the name of “The Open Web”. While passionate and earnest, the author seems to be operating on a number of fallacious assumptions that need to examined in closer detail.

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April 3, 2013

Related to Bug 854848 – Support the longdesc attribute

Talk about a sore loser… With respect to the Mozilla bug-tracker (where I originally wrote this, and then counted to ten – err, rather 8 before changing my mind), here is my original unvarnished response to Ian Hickson’s comments.

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March 12, 2012

Adding a New Category – Archive

I have added a new category to the ‘ol blog: Archive. You may find some of this interesting, or useless – no matter. None of it is new, and most of it will be archived material that was either previously posted at WATS.ca or has been kicking around my Hard Drive for a number of years.

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March 12, 2012

HTTP Error Codes (and what they mean)

Web servers will use the following Error Codes when something goes awry. Knowing what they mean enables you to fix the problem, or create custom error pages. The status codes are returned to the client making the request (typically an Internet Browser) and also recorded in the server’s log file.

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HTML5

February 20, 2012

HTML5 Accessibility: aria-hidden and role=”presentation”

It’s a common design pattern, seen multiple times a day: a thumbnail image and Headline, both linked to the same URL. We’ve seen this pattern for so long now that most sighted users know, instinctively, that clicking on either the thumbnail or the Headline takes them to the same location. However the code developers use to achieve this is a bit of a mess, and for non-sighted users or keyboard-only users, the User Experience (UX) leaves a lot to be desired: duplicate links announced for each article, and excessive tabbing through the content.

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