Category: Archive

SOAP - Archived

October 21, 2015

Foreign Languages on the Web – The “Lang” attribute and Classic Latin.

The Problem: A web page (or specifically a series of web pages) written in English also features extensive tracts of Classical Latin text – text originating from the 12th and 13th century. The W3C WCAG1 guidance states: “Clearly identify changes in the natural language of a document’s text and any text equivalents (e.g., captions).” (Priority 1, Checkpoint 4.1) The question however was whether or not undertaking the non-trivial task of marking up these Latin texts to meet the WCAG Requirement was worth the return on investment? ( Incipit: Holi writ haþ a liknesse to tre þat bereþ noote oþer appel)
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[WATS.ca Archived]

July 2, 2014

Readability and its Implications for Web Content Accessibility

One area of accessibility often overlooked is the readability of the content of your web pages. Not every user may be familiar with terms or terminology being used. Others may not have the same socio-political background, literacy skills or capacity to fully comprehend what it is you are saying. One goal of the content author then is to try and identify their target audience, and then ensures that they are not “writing over their heads”.

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[WATS.ca Archived]

July 2, 2013

ACCESS + KEY still = ACCESSKEY – The XHTML Role Access Module still flawed

The following article is a re-print of an Official Comment made to the Editors of the XHTMLTM 2 Draft Recommendation. It is presented here in a more open form to hopefully stimulate discussion and debate. If you believe, as I do, that the @key attribute has no place in XHTMLTM 2, I urge you to say so to the Draft Editors: www-html@w3.org

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[WATS.ca Archived]

March 12, 2013

Words With Dignity

Often, web developers and others responsible for producing accessible web content are at a loss to describe the various forms of disability their users may be dealing with. While we always want to avoid labeling any person by their specific disability, we must also recognize the various disabilities people deal with on a daily basis. Using the correct terms eases discussing the needs of these specific users.

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[WATS.ca Archived]

January 15, 2013

Accesskeys and Reserved Keystroke Combinations

In a non-scientific study conducted in the summer of 2002, we researched the availability of available Accesskeys which had not already been reserved by various other software technologies which might be employed by various users. The results indicated a real problem in that most ALT + __ keystroke combinations (assuming the Windows operating platform) have already been reserved by one type of application or another.

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